Month: October 2010

Shake Weight Follow-UP

Shake Weight Follow-UP

Shake Weight Past DD   Ok, so I have not been the best at religiously doing the shake weight” but this past week, I have done pretty well!  Along with some sit-ups after a short run, I brought out the shake weight a couple of […]

Favorite Friday Product – Almondina Cookies

Favorite Friday Product – Almondina Cookies

Almondina Cookies     WOW, WOW!!   These are absolutely wonderful!!  Dip in hot coffee and I am in heaven!  The perfect snack to satisfy your crunchy and sweet cravings!  Only 99 calories for three cookies.   I had some friends try these and they are hooked […]

Vitamin D – How much do you really need?

Vitamin D – How much do you really need?

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin that can be found in few food including fatty fish such as herring, mackerel, sardines and tuna. Vitamin D has been fortified to many food including dairy products, juices, and cereals but most vitamin D – 80% to 90% of what the body gets – is obtained through exposure to sunlight.

 

Vitamin D has recently received some great press with new healthy benefits to vitamin D such as

  • Reducing the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies show taking vitamin D seems to reduce women’s risk of getting MS by up to 40%. 

  • Preventing cancer. Some studies shows that people who take a high-dose vitamin D supplement plus calcium might have a lower chance of developing cancer of any type.

  • Weight loss. Women taking calcium plus vitamin D have been shown to be more likely to lose weight and maintain their weight. However, this was shown mainly in women who did not get adequate calcium intake before they started taking supplements.

  • Flu. Some research in school aged children show that taking a vitamin D supplement during winter might reduce the chance of getting seasonal flu.

  • Reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in older women.

AND MORE!

 

Wow, look at all the great information out there – so how much do we really need?  There are many association upping the recommended daily intake for vitamin D, especially those that do not live in the south and are vitamin D deficient due to low levels from the sun.

In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the recommended minimum daily intake of vitamin D to 400 IU daily for all infants and children, including adolescents.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends vitamin D 400 IU to 800 IU daily for adults under age 50, and 800 IU to 1000 IU daily for older adults.

The North American Menopause Society recommends 700 IU to 800 IU daily for women at risk of deficiency due to low sun exposure.

The Osteoporosis Society of Canada recommend vitamin D 400 IU per day for people up to age 50, and 800 IU per day for people over 50.

Osteoporosis Canada now recommends 400-1000 IU daily for adults under the age of 50 years and 800-2000 IU daily for adults over the age of 50 years.

The Canadian Cancer Society recommends 1000 IU/day during the fall and winter for adults in Canada. For those with a higher risk of having low vitamin D levels, this dose should be taken year round. This includes people who have dark skin, usually wear clothing that covers most of their skin, and people who are older or who don’t go outside often.

 

Right now there is still more research needed but it has been shown that vitamin D plays a key role and very important in the body – therefore getting adequate in a daily supplement plus eating foods that are high and good sources of vitamin D is essential to maintaining proper health.

Monday Motivation – Regroup, rethink, reassess

Monday Motivation – Regroup, rethink, reassess

We all fall of the track and usually venture on a trail of unhealthy eating where we just don’t care, don’t have time and tell ourselves – “I deserve this because I had a hard day,” etc.   We need to ask ourselves – Why […]

Favorite Friday Product – Powerbar Energy Bites

Favorite Friday Product – Powerbar Energy Bites

  Chewy and sweet!  My two favorite combos – yum!  What a great power snack that packs in the protein and flavor!  And for those endurance athletes – this is a great pick-me-up during those strenuous, grueling workouts with just the right amount of carbs […]

Vitamin C and Cold Season – Food or Supplement?

Vitamin C and Cold Season – Food or Supplement?

It is that time of year when the running noses, coughs are the first signs of the flu or weakened immune system.  It is also very critical for you to be eating a balanced diet and getting enough rest.

 

Vitamin C may also be known as the super-hero vitamin during flu and cold season but take a look at which sources they are coming from in your diet.  Vitamin C preventing and treating the common cold Are they coming from vitamin C drops, supplement or food sources?

 

Supplements seem to be getting a bad rap including recent finding that vitamins C and E and beta-carotene did not prevent cancer in women and vitamins C and E did nothing to prevent cancer in men nor did they prevent heart attacks Vitamin C and E not effective for heart prevention.

Supplements may fill in some loose ends in the diet but it is extremely important to build the base of good nutrition from REAL food! After hearing so many studies question the efficacy of supplements, I truly support the basics of eating a balanced diet for a healthy you!

 

Now back to fighting the cold and flu, orange juice seems to be one of the first foods that many turn when first symptoms appear but take a look at other high sources of vitamin C Dietary Guidelines for Americans

 

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for adult men is 90 mg and for adult women it is 75 mg. Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that is easily excreted in the body.

 

vitamin C’s function is necessary for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body and essential for healing wound and maintenance of cartilage, bones and teeth.  It is also a very well-known antioxidant. All fruits and vegetables contain some vitamin C but there are many that are good and excellent sources of vitamin C including green peppers, citrus fruits and juices, strawberries, tomatoes, broccoli, turnip greens and other leafy greens, sweet and white potatoes, cantaloupe, papaya, mango, watermelon, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, winter squash, red peppers, raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, and pineapples.

 

citrus

Simple Satisfying Turkey Chili

Simple Satisfying Turkey Chili

Source: Stacy Mitchell, RD, LD Ingredients 1 lb Honey Suckle Breakfast Turkey Sausage 1 can Muir Glen fire roasted tomatoes, no-salt-added 1 can corn, rinsed and drained 1 can chili beans 1 1/2 cups chopped celery   Preparation Brown turkey sausage in a skillet.  In […]